Betting Odds Converter

Converts odds between US, decimal, fractional, percentage, Hong Kong, Indonesian, and Malay formats

Odds Converter Inputs/Outputs

  • US Odds: Odds in US format (a negative number expresses the dollar amount that would need to be wagered in order to win $100, while a positive number expresses the dollar amount that would be won from a $100 wager)
  • Decimal Odds: Odds in decimal format (expresses the amount that would be returned from a $1 bet *inclusive* of original stake)
  • Fractional Odds: Odds in fractional format (expresses the fraction of a dollar that would be won from a $1 bet)
  • Implied Probability: The win probability that would imply zero vig on the offered line
  • Hong Kong Odds: Odds in Hong Kong format
  • Indonesian Odds: Odds in Indonesian format
  • Malay Odds: Odds in Malaysian format

How to use this sports handicapping tool


This odds conversion tool converts between US, decimal, fractional, Hong Kong, Indonesian, Malay oodds, and implied probability. Enter any one of the seven and the other six will be computed and displayed.

About International Odds Displays


There are three major formats in which most online sportsbooks quote odds:

  1. US Style or "Moneyline".
  2. European Style or "Decimal" style (aka "European" or "continental").
  3. Traditional or "Fractional" style (aka "British" or "traditional").
  4. Many Asian oriented sportsbook will also quote odds in "Hong Kong" style, "Indonesian" style, and "Malaysian" style formats.

US-style odds (most common, not surprisingly, found in the United States) are quoted as either a positive or a negative number.

When quoted as a negative number the betting odds figure represents the unit amount a bettor would need to risk in order to win 100 units. Hence, US odds of -200 imply a bettor would need to risk $200 in order to win $100 (so were he to win he would receive the $200 initial stake plus $100 in winnings).

When quoted as a positive number the odds figure represents the unit amount a player would win were he to risk 100 units.

Hence, US odds of +200 imply a bettor would need to risk $100 in order to win $200 (so were he to win he would receive the $100 initial stake plus $200 in winnings).

Using US-style odds, even odds bets are quoted as +100.

Decimal-style odds (most common outside the US, UK, and Ireland) are quoted as a positive number greater than 1 (typically displayed to 2 or more decimal places).

It represents the number of dollars that would be returned if the bet wins including the initial stake.

Hence, decimal odds of 1.5000 imply that if a $1 bet were to win, $1.50 would be returned to the bettor (the $1 initial stake plus $0.50 in winnings), while decimal odds of 3.0000 imply that if a $1 bet were to win $3 would be returned to the bettor (the $1 initial stake plus $2 in winnings).

Decimal odds of 1.5000 and 3.0000 are the equivalents of US odds of -200 and +200, respectively. Using decimal-style odds, even odds bets are quoted as 2.0000.

Fractional-style odds (most common in the UK and Ireland) are quoted as a fraction indicating the amount that would be paid out relative to a given stake.

Fractional odds of 1/2 imply that the bet would pay out 1 unit for every 2 units risked, while fractional odds of 2/1 imply that the bet would pay out $2 for every $1 risked. Fractional odds of 1/2 and 2/1 are the equivalents of US odds of -200 and +200, respectively.

Using fractional-style odds, an even odds bet would be quoted as 1/1.

Hong Kong-style odds are quoted as a positive number greater than 0 (typically displayed to 2 or more decimal places).

It represents the number of units that would be collected won in excess of the initial stake were the bet to win.

Hong Kong odds of 0.5000 imply that if a $1 bet were to win, the bettor would would collect $0.50 in winngs plus his initial $1 stake, while Hong Kong odds of 2.0000 imply that if a $1 bet were to win, the bettor would would collect $2 in winngs plus his initial $1 stake.

Hong Kong odds of 0.5000 and 2.0000 are the equivalents of US odds of -200 and +200, respectively.

Using Hong Kong-style odds, an even odds bet would be quoted as 1.0000.

Indonesian-style odds are quoted as a number with absolute value greater than 1 (typically displayed to 2 or more decimal places).

When Indonesian odds are positive they are interpretted in the same manner as Hong Kong odds, so Indonesian odds of 2.0000 imply that if a $1 bet were to win, the bettor would would collect $2 in winngs plus his initial $1 stake.

When quoted as a negative number the odds figure represents the unit amount a bettor would need to risk in order to win 1 units.

Indonesian odds of -2.0000 imply a bettor would need to risk $2 in order to win $1 (so were he to win he would receive the $2 initial stake plus $1 in winnings).

Indonesian-style odds always have one-tenth the value of their US-style counterparts. Hence Indonesian-style odds of -2.0000 and 2.0000 are the equivalents of US odds of -200 and +200, respectively.

Using Indonesian-style odds, an even odds bet would be quoted as 1.0000.

Malay-style odds are quoted as a number with absolute value no greater than 1 (typically displayed to 2 or more decimal places).

When Malay odds are positive they are interpretted in the same manner as Hong Kong odds, so Malay odds of 0.5000 imply that if a $1 bet were to win, the bettor would would collect $0.50 in winngs plus his initial $1 stake.

When quoted as a negative number the odds figure represents the unit amount a bettor would need to risk in order to win 1 units.

Malay odds of -0.5000 imply a bettor would need to risk $0.50 in order to win $1 (so were he to win he would receive the $0.50 initial stake plus $1 in winnings).

Malay-style odds of 0.5000 and -0.5000 are the equivalents of US odds of -200 and +200, respectively.

Using Malay-style odds, an even odds bet would be quoted as 1.0000.

(In all odds formats even odds bets may be quoted as "Even", "Evens" or 'Ev.".)

Associated with any given odds quotation is the win probability implied by those odds. This represents the probability with which the underlying event would need to occur to justify those odds. If the real probability were greater than the implied probability then the bet would be a good bet, while if it were lower it would be a bad bet. If the real probability were equal to the implied probability then the bet would be break-even.

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